{"id":4727154704431,"title":"FAIRSEA: 1941 - Big tissue deck plan from 1966","handle":"fairsea-1941-big-tissue-deck-plan-from-1966","description":"Sitmar Line: A satisfyingly big deck plan (27\" by 38\") issued in 1966 toward the end of this immigrant ship's career. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe FAIRSEA was built and served as an escort aircraft carrier during WW2. Sitmar bought her afterwards and converted her into an austerity ship to carry immigrants to Australia. Sitmar had the Australian government contract to bring people to Down Under and the ship was very profitable. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eStudying this deck plan you can see why. The 337 cabins held 1219 people. Other than a small group of deluxe cabins up on Boat Deck, most were little spaces crammed into the lower decks with large dormitory style washrooms down the hall. Seven decks are shown in detail. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eAt least there appeared to be plenty of deck space for claustrophobic passengers. There was an outdoor pool on Boat Deck and large public rooms on Promenade Deck with plenty of seats. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe ship was popular with passengers heading to a new life in Australia and fondly remembered today. In the late 1960s Sitmar lost the government contract to Chandris and that sealed the fate of this aging ship. In June 1969 she left on her last voyage from Australia with 985 onboard. Bill Miller in his excellent book, \"Passenger Liners Italian Style\", tells the story that the ship was immobilized by an engine room fire. The FAIRSEA drifted for days in the Pacific, water had to be rationed, and pool water was siphoned out for washing. A passing tug was unable to tow the ship. The captain committed suicide. A freighter finally towed the ship to Panama, a slow trip of 11 days. From there the exhausted passengers were flown to Europe and the decision was made to scrap the ship. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eVery good condition with light wear.","published_at":"2020-09-05T10:05:53-04:00","created_at":"2020-09-03T16:30:21-04:00","vendor":"MG","type":"- Deck Plans","tags":["- Deck Plans","A to Z: 100s of Ships","Sitmar Line (post-WW2)"],"price":3500,"price_min":3500,"price_max":3500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32601623035951,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"7494","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"FAIRSEA: 1941 - Big tissue deck plan from 1966","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":3500,"weight":45,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":2,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494.jpg?v=1599231435","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494-1.jpg?v=1599573265"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494.jpg?v=1599231435","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7425916403759,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.368,"height":999,"width":1367,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494.jpg?v=1599231435"},"aspect_ratio":1.368,"height":999,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494.jpg?v=1599231435","width":1367},{"alt":null,"id":7461931614255,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.703,"height":3416,"width":2403,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494-1.jpg?v=1599573265"},"aspect_ratio":0.703,"height":3416,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/7494-1.jpg?v=1599573265","width":2403}],"content":"Sitmar Line: A satisfyingly big deck plan (27\" by 38\") issued in 1966 toward the end of this immigrant ship's career. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe FAIRSEA was built and served as an escort aircraft carrier during WW2. Sitmar bought her afterwards and converted her into an austerity ship to carry immigrants to Australia. Sitmar had the Australian government contract to bring people to Down Under and the ship was very profitable. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eStudying this deck plan you can see why. The 337 cabins held 1219 people. Other than a small group of deluxe cabins up on Boat Deck, most were little spaces crammed into the lower decks with large dormitory style washrooms down the hall. Seven decks are shown in detail. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eAt least there appeared to be plenty of deck space for claustrophobic passengers. There was an outdoor pool on Boat Deck and large public rooms on Promenade Deck with plenty of seats. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe ship was popular with passengers heading to a new life in Australia and fondly remembered today. In the late 1960s Sitmar lost the government contract to Chandris and that sealed the fate of this aging ship. In June 1969 she left on her last voyage from Australia with 985 onboard. Bill Miller in his excellent book, \"Passenger Liners Italian Style\", tells the story that the ship was immobilized by an engine room fire. The FAIRSEA drifted for days in the Pacific, water had to be rationed, and pool water was siphoned out for washing. A passing tug was unable to tow the ship. The captain committed suicide. A freighter finally towed the ship to Panama, a slow trip of 11 days. From there the exhausted passengers were flown to Europe and the decision was made to scrap the ship. \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eVery good condition with light wear."}

FAIRSEA: 1941 - Big tissue deck plan from 1966

Product Description
Sitmar Line: A satisfyingly big deck plan (27" by 38") issued in 1966 toward the end of this immigrant ship's career.

The FAIRSEA was built and served as an escort aircraft carrier during WW2. Sitmar bought her afterwards and converted her into an austerity ship to carry immigrants to Australia. Sitmar had the Australian government contract to bring people to Down Under and the ship was very profitable.

Studying this deck plan you can see why. The 337 cabins held 1219 people. Other than a small group of deluxe cabins up on Boat Deck, most were little spaces crammed into the lower decks with large dormitory style washrooms down the hall. Seven decks are shown in detail.

At least there appeared to be plenty of deck space for claustrophobic passengers. There was an outdoor pool on Boat Deck and large public rooms on Promenade Deck with plenty of seats.

The ship was popular with passengers heading to a new life in Australia and fondly remembered today. In the late 1960s Sitmar lost the government contract to Chandris and that sealed the fate of this aging ship. In June 1969 she left on her last voyage from Australia with 985 onboard. Bill Miller in his excellent book, "Passenger Liners Italian Style", tells the story that the ship was immobilized by an engine room fire. The FAIRSEA drifted for days in the Pacific, water had to be rationed, and pool water was siphoned out for washing. A passing tug was unable to tow the ship. The captain committed suicide. A freighter finally towed the ship to Panama, a slow trip of 11 days. From there the exhausted passengers were flown to Europe and the decision was made to scrap the ship.

Very good condition with light wear.
$35.00
Maximum quantity available reached.