{"id":996475961391,"title":"DE GRASSE: 1924 - Tissue deck plan from 1928","handle":"de-grasse-1924-tissue-deck-plan-from-1928","description":"\u003cp\u003eFrench Line:  A 19” by 24” tissue plan dated April 1928 for the DE GRASSE showing both Cabin and Third class.  A sturdy little ship, the DE GRASSE had almost as many lives as the proverbial cat.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe color-coded plan shows great detail.  Cabin Class takes up most of the areas shown with public rooms, five varieties of cabins, utility areas, and outside deck space.  The class held four-hundred passengers.  On C and D decks are Third Class regions including a large Dining Salon, a Smoking Room with a dance floor, a laundry, a odd bits of deck space near the bow.  Seventeen-hundred folks were put up in Third.  D Deck cabins might accommodate a fraction so I suspect unseen are vast dormitories.   \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003e The DE GRASSE was laid down in 1920 but a shortage of steel delayed her launching for 4 years.  She served faithfully until the war.  When the Germans invaded France in 1940, the ship was scuttled in shallow water.  The Germans raised her and she served their cause until 1944 when she was scuttled again, this time by the retreating Germans.  But in September 1945 the DE GRASSE was raised yet again and rebuilt.  For a short time the DE GRASSE became France's largest passenger liner and the first CGT ship to reenter North Atlantic service.  In 1953 she was sold to Canadian Pacific to become their EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA.  In 1956 she was bought by Sicula Oceanica who renamed her VENEZUELA for South American service.  A date with rocks ended her career off Cannes in 1962, thirty-eight years and many adventures after her maiden voyage. \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003e Good condition with wear on the edges.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-10-26T16:16:16-04:00","created_at":"2018-10-26T16:17:20-04:00","vendor":"GW","type":"- Deck Plans","tags":["- Deck Plans","French Line"],"price":7500,"price_min":7500,"price_max":7500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":9581060358191,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"3621","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"DE GRASSE: 1924 - Tissue deck plan from 1928","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":7500,"weight":113,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/3621.jpg?v=1540839278","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/3621-1.jpg?v=1540839959"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/3621.jpg?v=1540839278","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eFrench Line:  A 19” by 24” tissue plan dated April 1928 for the DE GRASSE showing both Cabin and Third class.  A sturdy little ship, the DE GRASSE had almost as many lives as the proverbial cat.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe color-coded plan shows great detail.  Cabin Class takes up most of the areas shown with public rooms, five varieties of cabins, utility areas, and outside deck space.  The class held four-hundred passengers.  On C and D decks are Third Class regions including a large Dining Salon, a Smoking Room with a dance floor, a laundry, a odd bits of deck space near the bow.  Seventeen-hundred folks were put up in Third.  D Deck cabins might accommodate a fraction so I suspect unseen are vast dormitories.   \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003e The DE GRASSE was laid down in 1920 but a shortage of steel delayed her launching for 4 years.  She served faithfully until the war.  When the Germans invaded France in 1940, the ship was scuttled in shallow water.  The Germans raised her and she served their cause until 1944 when she was scuttled again, this time by the retreating Germans.  But in September 1945 the DE GRASSE was raised yet again and rebuilt.  For a short time the DE GRASSE became France's largest passenger liner and the first CGT ship to reenter North Atlantic service.  In 1953 she was sold to Canadian Pacific to become their EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA.  In 1956 she was bought by Sicula Oceanica who renamed her VENEZUELA for South American service.  A date with rocks ended her career off Cannes in 1962, thirty-eight years and many adventures after her maiden voyage. \u003cbr\u003e \u003cbr\u003e Good condition with wear on the edges.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

DE GRASSE: 1924 - Tissue deck plan from 1928

Product Description

French Line:  A 19” by 24” tissue plan dated April 1928 for the DE GRASSE showing both Cabin and Third class.  A sturdy little ship, the DE GRASSE had almost as many lives as the proverbial cat.  

The color-coded plan shows great detail.  Cabin Class takes up most of the areas shown with public rooms, five varieties of cabins, utility areas, and outside deck space.  The class held four-hundred passengers.  On C and D decks are Third Class regions including a large Dining Salon, a Smoking Room with a dance floor, a laundry, a odd bits of deck space near the bow.  Seventeen-hundred folks were put up in Third.  D Deck cabins might accommodate a fraction so I suspect unseen are vast dormitories.   

The DE GRASSE was laid down in 1920 but a shortage of steel delayed her launching for 4 years.  She served faithfully until the war.  When the Germans invaded France in 1940, the ship was scuttled in shallow water.  The Germans raised her and she served their cause until 1944 when she was scuttled again, this time by the retreating Germans.  But in September 1945 the DE GRASSE was raised yet again and rebuilt.  For a short time the DE GRASSE became France's largest passenger liner and the first CGT ship to reenter North Atlantic service.  In 1953 she was sold to Canadian Pacific to become their EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA.  In 1956 she was bought by Sicula Oceanica who renamed her VENEZUELA for South American service.  A date with rocks ended her career off Cannes in 1962, thirty-eight years and many adventures after her maiden voyage.

Good condition with wear on the edges.

$75.00
Maximum quantity available reached.