{"id":4698799112239,"title":"AMERICAN BANKER Class - 1930s plans \u0026 interiors","handle":"american-banker-class-1930s-plans-interiors","description":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAmerican Merchant Lines: A fold-out deck plan opening to 18\" by 30\" to reveal a large ship profile, deck plans, and several interior photos. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe AMERICAN BANKER class of ships - AMERICAN MERCHANT, AMERICAN BANKER, AMERICAN FRAMER, AMERICAN FARMER, AMERICAN TRADER, and AMERICAN SHIPPER, started out as \"Hog Island\" freighters in 1920. No one would ever argue that these ships were beautiful, but they were steady performers during the years 'tween wars. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eOwner U.S. Shipping Board added passengers accommodations for 12 in 1924 for a service from New York to London. When the big ex-German liner AMERICA burned in 1926 these five ships were modified by William Francis Gibbs to carry 74 in a basic Tourist Class all on one deck. That is what is shown on this deck plan from mid-1930s. The lay-out is very basic - besides a dining room there is a small lounge with a smoking room fitted into one corner. A recent addition was a bar since America had finally lifted Prohibition. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eMark Goldberg in his book \"The 'Hog Islanders'\" recounts the story of a voyage on the AMERICAN BANKER when it was chartered by American graduates of the famed Ecole des Beaux Arts heading to Paris for a reunion. To keep amused among the dreary décor the artists decided to spruce the place up by painting murals in the lounge and dining room. Those murals are visible in the photos in this brochure and they certainly made the BANKER the best dressed of the group. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAt the start of WW2 all five ships were transferred to the Belgian Soc. Maritime Anversoise. All except the AMERICAN BANKER were sunk by German torpedoes. After the war the ship became the AROSA KULM and was finally scrapped in 1959. American Merchant Lines increasingly was folded into United States Lines operations during the 1930s and by the end of the decade disappeared. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eVery good condition.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-08-03T00:00:07-04:00","created_at":"2020-08-02T17:05:02-04:00","vendor":"MG","type":"- Deck Plans","tags":["- Deck Plans","A to Z: 100s of Ships","American Merchant Lines","United States Lines"],"price":7500,"price_min":7500,"price_max":7500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32495167471663,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"12093","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"AMERICAN BANKER Class - 1930s plans \u0026 interiors","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":7500,"weight":45,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":4,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093.jpg?v=1596402304","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-1.jpg?v=1596478764","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-2.jpg?v=1596478764","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-4.jpg?v=1596478764","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-5.jpg?v=1596478764"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093.jpg?v=1596402304","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7175138738223,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.425,"height":1351,"width":574,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093.jpg?v=1596402304"},"aspect_ratio":0.425,"height":1351,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093.jpg?v=1596402304","width":574},{"alt":null,"id":7178610442287,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.851,"height":2854,"width":2430,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-1.jpg?v=1596478764"},"aspect_ratio":0.851,"height":2854,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-1.jpg?v=1596478764","width":2430},{"alt":null,"id":7178610540591,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.694,"height":1476,"width":2500,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-2.jpg?v=1596478764"},"aspect_ratio":1.694,"height":1476,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-2.jpg?v=1596478764","width":2500},{"alt":null,"id":7178610606127,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":3.415,"height":732,"width":2500,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-4.jpg?v=1596478764"},"aspect_ratio":3.415,"height":732,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-4.jpg?v=1596478764","width":2500},{"alt":null,"id":7178610638895,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.715,"height":1458,"width":2500,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-5.jpg?v=1596478763"},"aspect_ratio":1.715,"height":1458,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/12093-5.jpg?v=1596478763","width":2500}],"content":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAmerican Merchant Lines: A fold-out deck plan opening to 18\" by 30\" to reveal a large ship profile, deck plans, and several interior photos. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe AMERICAN BANKER class of ships - AMERICAN MERCHANT, AMERICAN BANKER, AMERICAN FRAMER, AMERICAN FARMER, AMERICAN TRADER, and AMERICAN SHIPPER, started out as \"Hog Island\" freighters in 1920. No one would ever argue that these ships were beautiful, but they were steady performers during the years 'tween wars. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eOwner U.S. Shipping Board added passengers accommodations for 12 in 1924 for a service from New York to London. When the big ex-German liner AMERICA burned in 1926 these five ships were modified by William Francis Gibbs to carry 74 in a basic Tourist Class all on one deck. That is what is shown on this deck plan from mid-1930s. The lay-out is very basic - besides a dining room there is a small lounge with a smoking room fitted into one corner. A recent addition was a bar since America had finally lifted Prohibition. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eMark Goldberg in his book \"The 'Hog Islanders'\" recounts the story of a voyage on the AMERICAN BANKER when it was chartered by American graduates of the famed Ecole des Beaux Arts heading to Paris for a reunion. To keep amused among the dreary décor the artists decided to spruce the place up by painting murals in the lounge and dining room. Those murals are visible in the photos in this brochure and they certainly made the BANKER the best dressed of the group. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAt the start of WW2 all five ships were transferred to the Belgian Soc. Maritime Anversoise. All except the AMERICAN BANKER were sunk by German torpedoes. After the war the ship became the AROSA KULM and was finally scrapped in 1959. American Merchant Lines increasingly was folded into United States Lines operations during the 1930s and by the end of the decade disappeared. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eVery good condition.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

AMERICAN BANKER Class - 1930s plans & interiors

Product Description

American Merchant Lines: A fold-out deck plan opening to 18" by 30" to reveal a large ship profile, deck plans, and several interior photos.

The AMERICAN BANKER class of ships - AMERICAN MERCHANT, AMERICAN BANKER, AMERICAN FRAMER, AMERICAN FARMER, AMERICAN TRADER, and AMERICAN SHIPPER, started out as "Hog Island" freighters in 1920. No one would ever argue that these ships were beautiful, but they were steady performers during the years 'tween wars.

Owner U.S. Shipping Board added passengers accommodations for 12 in 1924 for a service from New York to London. When the big ex-German liner AMERICA burned in 1926 these five ships were modified by William Francis Gibbs to carry 74 in a basic Tourist Class all on one deck. That is what is shown on this deck plan from mid-1930s. The lay-out is very basic - besides a dining room there is a small lounge with a smoking room fitted into one corner. A recent addition was a bar since America had finally lifted Prohibition.

Mark Goldberg in his book "The 'Hog Islanders'" recounts the story of a voyage on the AMERICAN BANKER when it was chartered by American graduates of the famed Ecole des Beaux Arts heading to Paris for a reunion. To keep amused among the dreary décor the artists decided to spruce the place up by painting murals in the lounge and dining room. Those murals are visible in the photos in this brochure and they certainly made the BANKER the best dressed of the group.

At the start of WW2 all five ships were transferred to the Belgian Soc. Maritime Anversoise. All except the AMERICAN BANKER were sunk by German torpedoes. After the war the ship became the AROSA KULM and was finally scrapped in 1959. American Merchant Lines increasingly was folded into United States Lines operations during the 1930s and by the end of the decade disappeared.

Very good condition.

$75.00
Maximum quantity available reached.