{"id":4358473547823,"title":"WASHINGTON: 1933 - One-Class austerity plan from 1948","handle":"washington-1933-one-class-austerity-plan-from-1948","description":"\u003cp\u003eUnited States Lines:  A sixteen-page deck plan brochure for the S.S. WASHINGTON’s One-Class, post-WW2 austerity service. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn pre-WW2 times, the WASHINGTON and sister MANHATTAN were among the most popular ships on the North Atlantic.  But after hard use as troopship, USL decided not to take the battered liners back from the U.S. Maritime Commission.  MANHATTAN went right to lay-up, never to sail again, while in 1948 United States Lines decided to charter their former liner for New York-Hamburg austerity service.  That is when this plan was issued.  For anyone who remembered the splendors of the pre-war WASHINGTON, the text reminds them of the changes: \"… while the WASHINGTON does not afford the luxurious passenger accommodations notable in her pre-war operation, she does offer essential comforts …\" \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe plan includes two big photos of the ship, reused from pre-war brochures, but no interior photos.  The WASHINGTON’s top three decks are laid-out about the same as in her pre-war configuration.  The Promenade Deck still has a long array of public rooms which must have been stripped of their finery.  On A Deck all the large former First Class cabins are still there.  The biggest difference on these decks is the addition of three big side-by-side stairways cut through the center of the ship to aid in the movement of troops.  But from B Deck down the ship is different.  The walls between the former Tourist cabins have been removed to create rooms with bunks beds sleeping up to ten.  The former dining rooms on C Deck now show long tables holding twelve or more.  A baggage room fills the space which formerly held the indoor pool.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUSL operated the WASHINGTON on this austerity service for three years before sending the ship to the Hudson River mothball fleet in 1951.  There she sat tied up to the former MANHATTAN until the mid-1960s when both ships were sent down river to the scrappers.  \u003c\/p\u003e\nVery good condition.","published_at":"2019-11-18T11:27:12-05:00","created_at":"2019-11-18T11:55:04-05:00","vendor":"MG","type":"- Deck Plans","tags":["- Deck Plans","United States Lines"],"price":7500,"price_min":7500,"price_max":7500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":31249031004207,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"1728","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"WASHINGTON: 1933 - One-Class austerity plan from 1948","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":7500,"weight":113,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":2,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728.jpg?v=1574182934","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-1.jpg?v=1574182934","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-2.jpg?v=1574182934"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728.jpg?v=1574182934","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":5693828071471,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.442,"height":650,"width":287,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728.jpg?v=1574182934"},"aspect_ratio":0.442,"height":650,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728.jpg?v=1574182934","width":287},{"alt":null,"id":5693828104239,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.751,"height":571,"width":1000,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-1.jpg?v=1574182934"},"aspect_ratio":1.751,"height":571,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-1.jpg?v=1574182934","width":1000},{"alt":null,"id":5693828137007,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":3.571,"height":280,"width":1000,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-2.jpg?v=1574182934"},"aspect_ratio":3.571,"height":280,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2236\/1411\/products\/1728-2.jpg?v=1574182934","width":1000}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003cp\u003eUnited States Lines:  A sixteen-page deck plan brochure for the S.S. WASHINGTON’s One-Class, post-WW2 austerity service. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn pre-WW2 times, the WASHINGTON and sister MANHATTAN were among the most popular ships on the North Atlantic.  But after hard use as troopship, USL decided not to take the battered liners back from the U.S. Maritime Commission.  MANHATTAN went right to lay-up, never to sail again, while in 1948 United States Lines decided to charter their former liner for New York-Hamburg austerity service.  That is when this plan was issued.  For anyone who remembered the splendors of the pre-war WASHINGTON, the text reminds them of the changes: \"… while the WASHINGTON does not afford the luxurious passenger accommodations notable in her pre-war operation, she does offer essential comforts …\" \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe plan includes two big photos of the ship, reused from pre-war brochures, but no interior photos.  The WASHINGTON’s top three decks are laid-out about the same as in her pre-war configuration.  The Promenade Deck still has a long array of public rooms which must have been stripped of their finery.  On A Deck all the large former First Class cabins are still there.  The biggest difference on these decks is the addition of three big side-by-side stairways cut through the center of the ship to aid in the movement of troops.  But from B Deck down the ship is different.  The walls between the former Tourist cabins have been removed to create rooms with bunks beds sleeping up to ten.  The former dining rooms on C Deck now show long tables holding twelve or more.  A baggage room fills the space which formerly held the indoor pool.  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUSL operated the WASHINGTON on this austerity service for three years before sending the ship to the Hudson River mothball fleet in 1951.  There she sat tied up to the former MANHATTAN until the mid-1960s when both ships were sent down river to the scrappers.  \u003c\/p\u003e\nVery good condition."}

WASHINGTON: 1933 - One-Class austerity plan from 1948

Product Description

United States Lines:  A sixteen-page deck plan brochure for the S.S. WASHINGTON’s One-Class, post-WW2 austerity service. 

In pre-WW2 times, the WASHINGTON and sister MANHATTAN were among the most popular ships on the North Atlantic.  But after hard use as troopship, USL decided not to take the battered liners back from the U.S. Maritime Commission.  MANHATTAN went right to lay-up, never to sail again, while in 1948 United States Lines decided to charter their former liner for New York-Hamburg austerity service.  That is when this plan was issued.  For anyone who remembered the splendors of the pre-war WASHINGTON, the text reminds them of the changes: "… while the WASHINGTON does not afford the luxurious passenger accommodations notable in her pre-war operation, she does offer essential comforts …" 

The plan includes two big photos of the ship, reused from pre-war brochures, but no interior photos.  The WASHINGTON’s top three decks are laid-out about the same as in her pre-war configuration.  The Promenade Deck still has a long array of public rooms which must have been stripped of their finery.  On A Deck all the large former First Class cabins are still there.  The biggest difference on these decks is the addition of three big side-by-side stairways cut through the center of the ship to aid in the movement of troops.  But from B Deck down the ship is different.  The walls between the former Tourist cabins have been removed to create rooms with bunks beds sleeping up to ten.  The former dining rooms on C Deck now show long tables holding twelve or more.  A baggage room fills the space which formerly held the indoor pool.  

USL operated the WASHINGTON on this austerity service for three years before sending the ship to the Hudson River mothball fleet in 1951.  There she sat tied up to the former MANHATTAN until the mid-1960s when both ships were sent down river to the scrappers.  

Very good condition.
$75.00
Maximum quantity available reached.